method perl

Documentation for method perl assembled from the following types:

class IO::Path

From IO::Path

(IO::Path) method perl

Defined as:

method perl(IO::Path:D: --> Str:D)

Returns a string that, when given passed through EVAL gives the original invocant back.

    "foo/bar".IO.perl.say;
    # OUTPUT: IO::Path.new("foo/bar", :SPEC(IO::Spec::Unix), :CWD("/home/camelia")) 

Note that this string includes the value of the .CWD attribute that is set to $*CWD when the path object was created, by default.

class IO::Path::Cygwin

From IO::Path::Cygwin

(IO::Path::Cygwin) method perl

Defined as:

method perl(IO::Path::Cygwin:D: --> Str:D)

Returns a string that, when given passed through EVAL gives the original invocant back.

    IO::Path::Cygwin.new("foo/bar").perl.say;
    # OUTPUT: IO::Path::Cygwin.new("foo/bar", :CWD("/home/camelia")) 

Note that this string includes the value of the .CWD attribute that is set to $*CWD when the path object was created, by default.

class IO::Path::QNX

From IO::Path::QNX

(IO::Path::QNX) method perl

Defined as:

method perl(IO::Path::QNX:D: --> Str:D)

Returns a string that, when given passed through EVAL gives the original invocant back.

    IO::Path::QNX.new("foo/bar").perl.say;
    # OUTPUT: IO::Path::QNX.new("foo/bar", :CWD("/home/camelia")) 

Note that this string includes the value of the .CWD attribute that is set to $*CWD when the path object was created, by default.

class IO::Path::Unix

From IO::Path::Unix

(IO::Path::Unix) method perl

Defined as:

method perl(IO::Path::Unix:D: --> Str:D)

Returns a string that, when given passed through EVAL gives the original invocant back.

    IO::Path::Unix.new("foo/bar").perl.say;
    # OUTPUT: IO::Path::Unix.new("foo/bar", :CWD("/home/camelia")) 

Note that this string includes the value of the .CWD attribute that is set to $*CWD when the path object was created, by default.

class IO::Path::Win32

From IO::Path::Win32

(IO::Path::Win32) method perl

Defined as:

method perl(IO::Path::Win32:D: --> Str:D)

Returns a string that, when given passed through EVAL gives the original invocant back.

IO::Path::Win32.new("foo/bar").perl.say;
# OUTPUT: IO::Path::Win32.new("foo/bar", :CWD("C:\\Users\\camelia")) 

Note that this string includes the value of the .CWD attribute that is set to $*CWD when the path object was created, by default.

class Junction

From Junction

(Junction) method perl

Defined as:

multi method perl(Junction:D:)

Collapses the Junction and returns a Str composed of perls of its components that evaluates to the equivalent Junction with equivalent components:

<a 42 c>.all.raku.put# OUTPUT: «all("a", IntStr.new(42, "42"), "c")␤»

class FatRat

From FatRat

(FatRat) method perl

multi method perl(FatRat:D: --> Str:D)

Returns an implementation-specific string that produces an equivalent object when given to EVAL.

    say FatRat.new(12).perl# OUTPUT: «FatRat.new(1, 2)␤» 

class Range

From Range

(Range) method perl

Defined as

multi method perl(Range:D:)

Returns an implementation-specific string that produces an equivalent object when given to EVAL.

    say (1..2).perl # OUTPUT: «1..2␤» 

class Mu

From Mu

(Mu) method perl

multi method perl(Mu: --> Str)

Returns a Raku-ish representation of the object (i.e., can usually be re-evaluated with EVAL to regenerate the object). The exact output of perl is implementation specific, since there are generally many ways to write a Raku expression that produces a particular value. Since the change of name to Raku, this method is deprecated and might disappear in the near future. Use .raku instead.

class Complex

From Complex

(Complex) method perl

Defined as:

method perl(Complex:D: --> Str:D)

Returns an implementation-specific string that produces an equivalent object when given to EVAL.

say (1-3i).raku;                # OUTPUT: «<1-3i>␤»

class Rat

From Rat

(Rat) method perl

multi method perl(Rat:D: --> Str:D)

Returns an implementation-specific string that produces an equivalent object when given to EVAL.

    say (1/3).perl;                # OUTPUT: «<1/3>␤» 
    say (2/4).perl;                # OUTPUT: «0.5␤»